johnleskodotbiz

It’s time (again) for some expeditionary thinking.

In Active Learning, Leave Your Comfort Zone, Open Space Technology on September 18, 2015 at 4:05 pm

This has been a most interesting summer …

  • I’ve been able to go hiking along the Appalachian Trail; completing the Dirty Dozen Hiking Challenge and learning a bit of Presidential history along the way.
  • I’ve spent several days as a senior facilitator working with student and adult groups who’ve visited The EDGE; watching these groups leave their comfort zone and discovering life lessons that can only be revealed when one stretches beyond ones normal range of learning.
  • I’ve been sailing on the Chesapeake Bay; helping a friend fix a couple of engine problems while we both reminded ourselves that we were okay and that so long as we had a mast and some sailcloth we’re get back to shore without having to call the Coast Guard.
After sailing into a cove and sleeping on the problem, my pal and I identified this oil leak and were able to fix things.

After sailing into a cove and sleeping on the problem, my pal and I identified this oil leak and were able to fix things.

Smooth sailing on the Chesapeake Bay.

Smooth sailing on the Chesapeake Bay.

  • And, if that weren’t enough, I’m reading a funny, funny book — A Walk in the Woods by Bill Bryson — with the hopes of finishing it before the movie by the same name leaves the local theaters.

Which brings me to the main point of this blog post …

What factors have led our society to depending so much upon so-called modern conveniences: air conditioning, fast food, and our electronic devices? When did we forget how to work with a map, read a compass, or discern the difference between poison ivy and a raspberry bush? And, when did scoring well on standardized tests become more important than creative problem-solving, working as a team, or applying some expeditionary thinking?

It’s time (again) to think outside — no box required.

A stream crossing along the Appalachian Trail

A stream crossing along the Appalachian Trail

 

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  1. Very compelling piece, John!

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