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Why experiential learning is more important than sleeping with your smartphone

In Active Learning, Aikido, High Tech, High Touch, Leave Your Comfort Zone on October 11, 2016 at 6:04 pm

On the topics of Know-How, Technology, and Tribal Knowledge

by John Lesko

 

Know-how is a term for practical knowledge on how to accomplish something, as opposed to “know-what” (facts), “know-why” (science), or “know-who” (communication). Know-how is often tacit knowledge, which means that it is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalizing it. (Source: Wikipedia)

Know-how is a term for practical knowledge on how to accomplish something, as opposed to “know-what” (facts), “know-why” (science), or “know-who” (communication). Know-how is often tacit knowledge, which means that it is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalizing it. (Source: Wikipedia)

If I tell you how to tie a figure 8 with a back-up knot, there’s a good chance it will take a long time for you to get it right. If I show you how, the odds for success improve. And if we practice tying knots together — before you know it — you’ll soon be dressing that knot and either climbing or belaying with confidence in your equipment.

 

Technology ("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia[3]) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, etc. or it can be embedded in machines, computers, devices and factories, which can be operated by individuals without detailed knowledge of the workings of such things. (Source: Wikipedia)

Technology (“science of craft”, from Greek τέχνη, techne, “art, skill, cunning of hand”; and -λογία, -logia[3]) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, etc. or it can be embedded in machines, computers, devices and factories, which can be operated by individuals without detailed knowledge of the workings of such things. (Source: Wikipedia)

What are the 5 keys to mastery according to Sensei George Leonard?

  1. Seek Instruction
  2. Practice, Practice, Practice
  3. Surrender to the Discipline
  4. Work the Mental Game
  5. Push The Edge

 

 

If you aspire to master an art or trade, consider studying the technology of learning. Apply the above listed five keys to mastery and soon others will seek your counsel and insight.

Tribal knowledge is any information or knowledge that is known within a tribe but often unknown outside of it. A tribe may be a group or subgroup of people that share a common knowledge. With a corporate perspective, "Tribal Knowledge or know-how is the collective wisdom of the organization. It is the sum of all the knowledge and capabilities of all the people.” (Source: Wikipedia)

Tribal knowledge is any information or knowledge that is known within a tribe but often unknown outside of it. A tribe may be a group or subgroup of people that share a common knowledge. With a corporate perspective, “Tribal Knowledge or know-how is the collective wisdom of the organization. It is the sum of all the knowledge and capabilities of all the people.” (Source: Wikipedia)

Where do you find opportunities to practice? How can you optimize your learning? Seek out others who have studied what it is you’d like to learn. Then join their dojo. Become a member of their “tribe.”

 

Now as for spending your time on-line, visiting and/or living in a virtual world …

Ask yourself which you enjoy better: sharing a hug & kiss in real life or pretending while wearing goggles and staring at a screen. Which experience allows you to break a sweat and get your hands dirty?
To live a better life, you must experience it. Think outside the box. Put down that smartphone or tablet, turn off your computer. Think outside — no box or batteries required. Bye for now …

 

the-mountains-are-calling

Note: This art is a father-daughter collaboration. The original, numbered print is by Kelsey Lesko. Placing it in an inexpensive frame w/ the John Muir quote is my idea.

 

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