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Archive for the ‘High Tech’ Category

Why experiential learning is more important than sleeping with your smartphone

In Active Learning, Aikido, High Tech, High Touch, Leave Your Comfort Zone on October 11, 2016 at 6:04 pm

On the topics of Know-How, Technology, and Tribal Knowledge

by John Lesko

 

Know-how is a term for practical knowledge on how to accomplish something, as opposed to “know-what” (facts), “know-why” (science), or “know-who” (communication). Know-how is often tacit knowledge, which means that it is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalizing it. (Source: Wikipedia)

Know-how is a term for practical knowledge on how to accomplish something, as opposed to “know-what” (facts), “know-why” (science), or “know-who” (communication). Know-how is often tacit knowledge, which means that it is difficult to transfer to another person by means of writing it down or verbalizing it. (Source: Wikipedia)

If I tell you how to tie a figure 8 with a back-up knot, there’s a good chance it will take a long time for you to get it right. If I show you how, the odds for success improve. And if we practice tying knots together — before you know it — you’ll soon be dressing that knot and either climbing or belaying with confidence in your equipment.

 

Technology ("science of craft", from Greek τέχνη, techne, "art, skill, cunning of hand"; and -λογία, -logia[3]) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, etc. or it can be embedded in machines, computers, devices and factories, which can be operated by individuals without detailed knowledge of the workings of such things. (Source: Wikipedia)

Technology (“science of craft”, from Greek τέχνη, techne, “art, skill, cunning of hand”; and -λογία, -logia[3]) is the collection of techniques, skills, methods and processes used in the production of goods or services or in the accomplishment of objectives, such as scientific investigation. Technology can be the knowledge of techniques, processes, etc. or it can be embedded in machines, computers, devices and factories, which can be operated by individuals without detailed knowledge of the workings of such things. (Source: Wikipedia)

What are the 5 keys to mastery according to Sensei George Leonard?

  1. Seek Instruction
  2. Practice, Practice, Practice
  3. Surrender to the Discipline
  4. Work the Mental Game
  5. Push The Edge

 

 

If you aspire to master an art or trade, consider studying the technology of learning. Apply the above listed five keys to mastery and soon others will seek your counsel and insight.

Tribal knowledge is any information or knowledge that is known within a tribe but often unknown outside of it. A tribe may be a group or subgroup of people that share a common knowledge. With a corporate perspective, "Tribal Knowledge or know-how is the collective wisdom of the organization. It is the sum of all the knowledge and capabilities of all the people.” (Source: Wikipedia)

Tribal knowledge is any information or knowledge that is known within a tribe but often unknown outside of it. A tribe may be a group or subgroup of people that share a common knowledge. With a corporate perspective, “Tribal Knowledge or know-how is the collective wisdom of the organization. It is the sum of all the knowledge and capabilities of all the people.” (Source: Wikipedia)

Where do you find opportunities to practice? How can you optimize your learning? Seek out others who have studied what it is you’d like to learn. Then join their dojo. Become a member of their “tribe.”

 

Now as for spending your time on-line, visiting and/or living in a virtual world …

Ask yourself which you enjoy better: sharing a hug & kiss in real life or pretending while wearing goggles and staring at a screen. Which experience allows you to break a sweat and get your hands dirty?
To live a better life, you must experience it. Think outside the box. Put down that smartphone or tablet, turn off your computer. Think outside — no box or batteries required. Bye for now …

 

the-mountains-are-calling

Note: This art is a father-daughter collaboration. The original, numbered print is by Kelsey Lesko. Placing it in an inexpensive frame w/ the John Muir quote is my idea.

 

Democracy in action. It’s a beautiful thing!

In Communication, High Tech, High Touch, leadership, Open Space Technology on October 20, 2012 at 9:51 pm

“Thank you very much for facilitating last night.  The school board gave rave reviews on your ability to stay on point and making sure that everyone’s voice was heard.  Your kindness to volunteer last night is extremely appreciated.”

City of Manassas community forum (left)

City of Manassas community forum (center)

While much of of America was preparing for or listening to the Presidential candidate debate, many concerned citizens from the City of Manassas were also participating in a community forum focused on local issues.

Image of the program for the evening …

Democracy in action.  It’s a beautiful thing.  I’m glad that I volunteered to serve as one of several facilitators who helped collect inputs on schools, roads, government facilities, programs, parks, and recreation.

Back from the Future: Part 1

In facilitation skills, High Tech, sharpen the saw on May 17, 2012 at 1:38 am

How far will you travel to continue your professional development?

On the alignment of “lucky stars”

In Alignment, Communication, elbow grease, High Tech, High Touch, leadership, Luck on March 19, 2012 at 5:20 pm

Venus and Jupiter March 2012

A neighbor and good friend of mine the other night pointed up into the sky and said, “Check out Venus and Jupiter.” 

So I just had to ask, “How do you know that’s Venus and Jupiter?  Are you some sort of astronaut or astronomer?”

He quipped, “Well, I am an officer in the Air Force and we do rule the skies.”

We laughed about this corny joke and he went on to say something about this alignment being called the conjunction of Venus and Jupiter.   So I pulled out my iPhone and captured the image seen here.  Later I dropped the  jpeg-file into some slideware, add a few labels, arrows, and a photo credit … And voilà!  We’ve got the subject of today’s blog post.  But what is it about unseasonably warm weather  in mid-March and/or the alignment of “two stars” that captures our imagination?  What makes us feel that this sign in the heavens may bring us good luck?

Julius Caesar wasn’t so lucky on the Ides of March.  And if you’ve been following the economic news of countries such as Portugal, Ireland, Greece, and Spain you’d have to ask, “Just how lucky are those stars?”  And if the whole story be shared here, I was recently at a party and overheard someone say that St. Patrick is needed still in Ireland — to round up a few snakes who’ve plunged their economy into the state it’s in.  Excuse me, I digress or perhaps that fellow was spreading a little Blarney.

So what’s the point and how is this all related to the focus of this blog?

Facilitators, discussion leaders, managers, and others are many times faced with explaining or helping groups discern between matters of fact (science) and matters of opinion (based on superstition, the reading tea leaves, or the alignment of the stars).  How do you deal with the irrational or the superstition?  How do you account for luck and its role in decision-making?  Please, if you’ve read this far, do comment on this post.  And if you’re interested in my thoughts …

Well, one of my favorite quotes on the alignment or conjunction of work and luck has been attributed to our Third President of the United States, Thomas Jefferson.  He said …

“I am a great believer in luck, and I find the harder I work, the more I have of it.”

 

It’s a small world … And getting smaller every day.

In High Tech, How To on January 5, 2012 at 12:23 am

Today's technologies are making the world smaller still.

My wife and I recently spoke with our son, Jonathan, stationed on the island of Santiago in Cape Verde.  He’s in his first year as a Peace Corps Volunteer teaching English as a 2nd language to middle and young high school students.  We routinely hear from him via his blog and speak with him by phone on roughly a weekly basis.  Jonathan lives 300 nautical miles off the coast of West Africa.  We live in Northern Virginia about 30 miles south of Washington, DC.

Jonathan called us using a MAGIC JACK phone then we switched to a free Skype call.  These technologies enabled us to share news and to see each other in near-real-time.  Call me “Old School” but what amazed me about this call was how these internet-based technologies are available to oh-so-many folks for a very reasonable price.  All you need is a computer with a decent internet connection.  And if you’re using a MAGIC JACK phone, this hardware is reasonably prices too.

Very soon we’re going to experiment with adding other participants to future calls.  Today, teleconferencing isn’t just for large corporations nor do you need deep pockets to afford paying for such connections.  If you’ve not yet experimented with such tools, resolve in the New Year to do so.  Yes, it’s a small world after all.

A Better Icebreaker

In Cool Ideas, High Tech, High Touch, Tips re: Professional Development on June 26, 2011 at 12:44 am

How many times have you found yourself at the start of a meeting when the leader suggests that, “we quickly go around the room and introduce ourselves”?

And then how many times were you able to remember the names, titles, organizations, expectations, and/or intentions of any of your fellow participants?

If you’ve answered “oh-too-often” to the first question and “oh-too-seldom” to the second, then by all means, read on.  Better yet, consider printing this 3-page cartoon and try this technique for an oh-so-much better icebreaker activity the next time you’re asked to facilitate or lead a meeting.

How to BREAK THE ICE w/ PURPOSE_page 1 of 3

How to BREAK THE ICE w/ PURPOSE_page 2 of 3

How to BREAK THE ICE w/ PURPOSE_page 3 of 3

KUDOS to Lonnie Weiss, CPF, and Nancy Aronson, Ph.D., for their superb workshop on meeting design shared with members of the Mid-Atlantic Facilitators Network.  And for anyone who might be interested in continued professional development as a facilitator, do join the International Association of Facilitators and/or a regional guild such as MAFN.  Consider also becoming “connected” via one of the facilitation-related Linked In discussion groups (a.k.a., a cyber community of practice).

Finally, if you’d like to see more “How To” cartoons in future blog posts, comment below with any special requests.  Thanks in advance.  And good luck with your next “icebreaker.”

“It’s elementary, my dear Watson.”

In Facilitating Genius, High Tech on February 19, 2011 at 1:36 am

What if you could harness the wisdom of a network of geniuses?  What if you could process information at the speed of IBM’s WATSON or even DEEP BLUE?

E.N.I.A.C. calculated trajectories at the US Army Ballistic Research Laboratory.

Our use of electronic computers is short-lived.  E.N.I.A.C.’s computing power was harnessed to assist with the calculation of ballistic trajectory for WWII-era artillery.

Today some are lost without the assistance of their iPhone, Android, and/or GPS-enabled personal mini-computers that help us coordinate a meeting with co-workers or friends, locate the nearest Thai restaurant for our lunch-time meeting, and/or helps us select the best movie house to visit with that special someone (perhaps met through an on-line dating service).

The performance of WATSON on Jeopardy earlier in the week captured the attention of many.  Some claimed this machine had an unfair advantage ‘buzzing in.’  Others were perplexed by this computer’s betting strategy.  If you’ve got 30+ minutes, consider hearing from the computer scientists who programmed Watson.

IBM's Watson out-paces two Jeopardy champions on national TV.

So imagine what we can do within a group decision-making situation if we’re assisted by a Certified Professional Facilitator -and- we have access to a network of geniuses.  We can harness the knowledge, skills, and abilities of our subject matter experts present and easily accessible.  We might broaden our team with connections to experts outside our immediate problem-solving team.

A friend and colleague of mine from the Mid-Atlantic Facilitator Network suggests that we always keep an empty chair in any meeting room where we’ve gathered a team to tackle a wicked problem.  This chair then becomes a visual reminder to all assembled that there’s expertise available to the group that may not be present in the room.  There is know-how and answers and technology to be harnessed even when we’ve reached a consensus among those present.

Just as Sherlock Holmes — fictional detective who lived at 221b Baker Street, London, England — would proclaim as he solved a forensic mystery, “It’s elementary, my dear Watson,” we too need to consider the elementary importance of today’s computers and the connectivity of the world-wide-web.

By all means, round up the usual suspects. And then invite a few creative types too.

In Cartooning, Facilitating Genius, High Tech on February 12, 2011 at 10:39 pm

At your next tech assessment or problem-solving workshop, round up the usual suspects and a few creative types too.

Comic Strip Ad for CPS Workshops

Community access TV and YouTube bring video to all who seek to ‘become a star.’

In Facilitating Business, High Tech on February 6, 2011 at 8:41 pm

A few weeks ago — visit the archive and see my post from January 21, 2011 — I suggested that anyone could become a star or at least a competent local TV spokesperson.  I also shared copies of the two poster-style cue cards I placed just below the camera lens allowing me to keep pace with my speech and not forget my material.

Well this show is now accessible thru VIMEO.  The entire show is found at http://vimeo.com/19149066 and if you have 30 minutes I suggest you might watch it.   But if you’re interested in seeing yours truly, advance the tape to the 10:15 “time hack” you’ll learn more about “the Importance of Club Level Programming” and how to “Close the Sale” at a Toastmasters’ meeting.

Remember that when you focus on “WIIFM-HD” — What’s In It For (the) Member – Highly Distinguished — you will be more likely to convert a prospect into a new member.   Focus on the benefits of membership.  Tailor your message to meet the prospect’s needs.

Don’t worry about winning a Golden Globe or a daytime Emmy.  Look for opportunities to use community access TV or web-based video to advance your business and share your message.

Consider reporting with a COMIC

In Cartooning, Cool Ideas, High Tech on January 25, 2011 at 2:30 am

Everyone likes comics.

It’s been my experience that few folks out-grow their love of comics.  So consider reporting the results of a workshop or meeting by creating a comic strip that uses photos taken of participants in attendance.  Handouts can also be created by selectively mixing images from stock photos with an outline of what will be covered in training.

MAFN Workshop Comic Report (<– Click here for an example of a 1-page summary from a workshop conducted in December 2010.)

VPM Training 1-25-2011 (<– Click here for an example of a handout for Vice Presidents Membership at District 27 Toastmasters Leadership Institute)

These images were created w/ COMIC LIFE – Deluxe Edition.